Welcome to St. George’s History

St. George’s History comprises individual articles, documents and collections around the 300 year history of St. George’s Episcopal Church, located in Fredericksburg Virginia. This site is unrelated to St. George's main website.

Supplementing them are a category-based search, a content index and a timeline. We have two tour documents - a building summary and a 15 minute walking tour you can take in the church. We also have a sister site just about the graveyard.

If this is your first visit, check out the 2 tours - building summary and a 15 minute walking tour.

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Recent articles

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FredericksburgNews – May 9, 1848 – erection of the 3rd church

Return to referring page This was before the church was consecrated in 1849. Related Content thecolonialchurchesofspotsylvaniaandcarolinecounties 111-0089_Saint_Georges_Episcopal_Church_2018_NRHP_FINAL2 quenzelchapter2 Quenzel- Chapter 2 – text Trip Wiggins Archives Index as of 05-01-08 St. George’s Burials, 1859-1913 profile2014 A Walking Tour of St. George’s Episcopal Church

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The 1849 Church Builders

Return to referring page More support for Robert Cary Long as St. George’s architect who practiced in Baltimore with examples of workers for St. George’s hired from Baltimore: During the 1981 renovation, Barbara Willis noted the following names written in chalk and covered on the right hand stair wall in the narthex, June, 1981. William […]

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Views of the Second Church

Return to referring page On Oct 18, 1815, the Virginia Herald reported the consecration of the 2nd Church on Sunday, Oct. 15, 1815 by Bishop Channing Moore. “The occasion brought together a larger congregation than was ever witnessed in this place. About sixty persons were confirmed; and the Holy Sacrament of the Lord’s Supper was […]

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Colonial Parishioners

Return to referring page

Big Red Doors

Views of the Second Church

Return to referring page On Oct 18, 1815, the Virginia Herald reported the consecration of the 2nd Church on Sunday, Oct. 15, 1815 by Bishop Channing Moore. “The occasion brought together a larger congregation than was ever witnessed in this place. About sixty persons were confirmed; and the Holy Sacrament of the Lord’s Supper was […]

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The Three Churches of St. George’s Fredericksburg- Barbara P. Willis

Return to referring page BARBARA P. WILLIS The first church built in Fredericksburg was by action of the Vestry of St. George’s Parish at a meeting on March 13th, 1732. Col. Henry Willis contracted to build it and the new church at Mattapony for 150,000 lbs. of tobacco. George Home, who surveyed the newly established […]

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Notes on the Creation of the First St. George’s building

Return to referring page These notes are from Paula Felder and were addressed to Barbara Willis and at the Central Rappahannock Regional Library. Felder was possibly the leading colonial historian in Fredericksburg Related Content 111-0089_Saint_Georges_Episcopal_Church_2018_NRHP_FINAL2 Baptisms 1858-1914, St. George’s Records Trip Wiggins Archives Index as of 05-01-08 Docent Manual 2017 thecolonialchurchesofspotsylvaniaandcarolinecounties Oral History, The Reverend […]

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The Pews

Return to referring page 1. Pews, Part 1 2. Pews, Part 2 3. Pews, Part 3 4. Pews, Part 4 5. Pews, Part 5 6. Pews, Part 6 Related Content The Pews, Part 2 The Pews, Part 2 The Pews, Part 2 The Pews, Part 1 The Pews, Part 1 The Pews, Part 1 A […]

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Reuben Thom (1782-1868)

Return to referring page There are two marble plaques inside the Church toward the front.  One of the individuals is well-known – Rev. Edward McGuire who served the Church for 45 years from 1813-58.  The other plaque on the right or south side of the Church honors a gentleman less well known – Reuben Thom. […]

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A Sunday School Lesson on Rev. Edward McGuire – Trip Wiggins

Return to referring page Editor’s note – Trip Wiggins is St. George’s archivist Rev. Edward Charles McGuire. What do we know about him? Longest serving Rector of St. George’s (45+ years) Only Rector buried in our churchyard McGuire Hall named after him We have a nice portrait of him and his wife in McGuire Hall […]

Getting Started in St. George's History - 6 essential resources

Selections from several categories of our history that are a great starting point.

1. Carrol Quenzel's History of St. George's

Quenzel's 1951 history is still the standard for the church. He was a librarian for Mary Washington College as well as being active at St. George's, helping to create the St. Georgian newsletter as well as a part of the Vestry. We have the entire book online which was published by St. George's

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2. The Three Churches of St. George's - Barbara Willis

Barbara Willis was a local historian and writer and long time St. Georgian with her husband Mac. This paper is a detailed summary of the evolution of St. George's church from its wooden colonial church to the impressive 1849 brick building we have today.

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3. St. George's Civil War

The Civil War may be the most popular historic topic in all of our history. The church served in 3 capacities - as a fortress, center of revival and as a hospital. We have a 9 part series on our role and relationship to Fredericksburg.

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4. Rev. Edward McGuire

McGuire served all 3 churches over the course of 45 years. He is probably the most influential of all our rectors in all phases of ministry from preaching, teaching, and outreach. Trip Wiggins, our archivist, wrote this for a Sunday school class and has been teaching classes for years

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5. Charles Syndor on Social Policy

Charles Sydnor served St. George's from 1972-2003 and was responsible for furthering Thomas Faulkner's outreach ministries and creating new ones. This paper he wrote in 2009 was for an adult forum in that year.

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6. Tom Faulkner confronts the Vestry on race

Faulkner served St. George's for 30 years from 1946-1976. During these years racial policies were paramount, especially 1954, in the year of Brown vs. Board of Education, Faulkner was challenged by the Vestry on the role of Blacks in our service. He was able to move St. George's toward racial justice that other rectors would further

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